Trinny and Susannah Go Chemo Chic!

trinny and susannah kissingThose fabulous fashionistas Trinny & Susannah have written a brilliant article on their blog – all about how to dress comfortably and stylishly after a mastectomy. We totally endorse their approach, and they totally endorse Chemo Chic. It’s an all-round love-in!

Read Trinny and Susannah’s excellent style tips here.

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Amanda Goes Paraben-Free

Amanda WardellAfter Amanda O’Neill was diagnosed with breast cancer she became concerned about toxic ingredients in beauty products, both for herself and for her baby daughter. Amanda writes:

In June 2010, aged 33, and just after the birth of my little girl, I was shocked to hear the words “you have cancer.” I was diagnosed with breast cancer – a grade three invasive ductal carcinoma.

At the time, I didn’t fully understand what that meant but I knew it wasn’t good news. As a child, I watched my very beautiful mother battle brain cancer, so I knew what to expect of the chemotherapy, but Continue reading

Things I wish I’d known before #3 – How to evaluate complementary therapies

Angelina Jolie - anyone can be affected by breast cancer

Angelina Jolie – anyone can be affected by breast cancer

Debate rages on the internet following Angelina Jolie’s announcement that she has had a preventative double-mastectomy. Everyone, it seems, has an opinion. But where does this leave the person who really matters – the patient?

When serious illness strikes, we search for cures. It’s a perfectly sane reaction to a life-threatening situation. In fact, it may feel almost irresponsible not to do so. Unfortunately there are some people ready and willing to exploit our fear and desperation, whether it be for profit or personal aggrandisement. Others have more philanthropic motives but may be strongly influenced by their own personal belief system. Continue reading

Good Glamour

PINK is bustin’ out all o-o-ver. If you’ve been anywhere near a department store in the last couple of weeks you will not have failed to notice that it is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

To celebrate, I’ve been down to the hospital and had a bunch of scans and mammograms and they’re all clear!

Breast cancer awareness month is obviously a not-to-be-missed opportunity for celebrities to flaunt their caring credentials. But what about your friend who is actually going through breast cancer? Is she out at some cosmetics-industry sponsored party, drinking pink champagne, snacking on smoked salmon and strawberry cupcakes and being photographed for Heat magazine? Hell no! Continue reading

Not the Year You Had Planned

Cathy McCarthy was diagnosed with breast cancer in November 2007. She had surgery, 6 sessions of chemotherapy and 33 sessions of radiotherapy. Having recovered  from the treatment she feels blessed to now be so well. She describes her bout with cancer as an opportunity to get living:

May you find the wisdom to listen to your illness? Ask it why it came, where it wants to take you What it wants you to know, What quality of space it wants to create in you What you need to learn to become more fully yourself That your presence may shine in the world. – John O’Donohue

It is a great shock to be diagnosed with any form of cancer. It takes a while to filter the information and to believe that you are the one with the cancer.

When I was diagnosed I decided I was going to make the most of the unexpected year in my life. It was not the year I had planned, but it was the year I had been given. Continue reading

A Letter to My Last Born

Eloise Hopkins wrote a letter that helped her to process some difficult emotions:

There are no notes to refer to of that time. The emotions so raw and powerful they couldn’t bear analysis. Could be barely lived through.

I found the lump in my breast whilst feeding you, sat cuddled up close on my bed. Investigations followed with me curious to know the cause. A blocked milk duct was my guess but the consultant soon disabused me of that notion. “We found something. It’s cancer.”

My tears at diagnosis were not for mortality but for the loss. Our loss. Desperate phone calls to experts for advice followed. Hurriedly rushing to every door, every opportunity explored. The answer emerged clearer and clearer. The feeding must stop. The milk must stop. And it must stop quickly.  Continue reading

Judith Goes Natural

Chemo Chic reader Judith writes…

I lost all my hair after chemotherapy for breast cancer. When my hair started to grow back it was greyish and a bit curly. Prior to treatment it was straight and honey-blonde with a bit of grey underneath (which foils disguised). I decided not to colour anymore (I have that fear of chemicals etc.) and to just let it do whatever it wanted. It was exciting in a way to emerge as a new person and lovely to have hair back again. Continue reading